A powerful talk from Hugh Herr, 7 years in the making

TED Blog

Hugh Herr's talk transfixed the audience at TED2014, and has now been viewed nearly 2 million times. So it might surprise some to know that his talk took nearly 7 years to happen. Photo: James Duncan Davidson Hugh Herr’s talk transfixed the audience at TED2014, and has now been viewed nearly 2 million times. So it might surprise some to know that his talk took nearly 7 years to happen. Photo: James Duncan Davidson

“As you can see, my legs are bionic,” said Hugh Herr on the TED2014 stage. “The artificial part of my body is malleable, able to take on any form, any function, a blank slate through which to create structures that can extend beyond biological capability.”

Standing tall in a suit hemmed at his knees, Herr spoke eloquently about his work creating the next generation of bionic limbs. He demonstrated how his own worked as he spoke, moving gracefully around the red carpet. This talk—which ended with ballroom dancer Adrianne Haslet-Davis performing for the first time since she lost her left leg in the Boston Marathon bombing—was one of the most-beloved of TED2014…

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Five of best Writing & Writers Advice Videos

Five of best Writing & Writers Advice Videos

A collection of five short videos presenting simply valuable advice for writing and writers

How to Tell if You’re a Writer?

For John Irving, the need for a daily ration of solitude was his strongest “pre-writing” moment as a child. So he discovered a difference, or a need to entertain!

 

Tom Perrotta debunks the maxim of always writing what you know

Tom Perrotta’s Advice to Writers

Anne personalize writing advice

Anne Rice share some of her personal insights into writing.

 

What Do You Have To Sacrifice To Be a Writer?

Nothing, according to Mosley. He wakes up early every day so he can write before most people even read their morning paper.

 

 

Christopher Hitchens Advice for Writers

Every day, the New York Times carries a motto in a box on its front page. “All the News That’s Fit to Print,” it says. It’s been saying it for decades, day in and day out. I imagine most readers of the canonical sheet have long ceased to notice this bannered and flaunted symbol of its mental furniture. I myself check every day to make sure that the bright, smug, pompous, idiotic claim is still there. Then I check to make sure that it still irritates me. If I can still exclaim, under my breath, why do they insult me and what do they take me for and what the hell is it supposed to mean unless it’s as obviously complacent and conceited and censorious as it seems to be, then at least I know I still have a pulse. You may wish to choose a more rigorous mental workout but I credit this daily infusion of annoyance with extending my lifespan.

“Beware the irrational, however seductive. Shun the ‘transcendent’ and all who invite you to subordinate or annihilate yourself. Distrust compassion; prefer dignity for yourself and others. Don’t be afraid to be thought arrogant or selfish. Picture all experts as if they were mammals. Never be a spectator of unfairness or stupidity. Seek out argument and disputation for their own sake; the grave will supply plenty of time for silence. Suspect your own motives, and all excuses. Do not live for others any more than you would expect others to live for you.”
— Christopher Hitchens